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Celebrate the Chinese New Year

S Caron By

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The Chinese New Year is nearly upon us, bringing new chances for luck and fortune. Here’s how to plan a fabulous party to celebrate!

This Lunar New Year, also known as Chinese New Year, we’ll be welcoming the year 4709, the Year of the Rabbit. And if you want to get more precise, Feb. 3 will usher in the Year of the Metal Rabbit.

From what I’ve read, the Year of the Rabbit will be a milder, calmer year than this last year. (Can I get a collective "Thank goodness!" here?) This year will be all about keeping the peace, and being a gentle negotiator.

Want to throw your own Chinese New Year Party? Start with the décor. Red and gold are the traditional colors (you should wear red too – it’s supposed to scare away bad spirits). Cate O’Malley of Sweetnicks has a great post on the little interesting facets of Chinese New Year celebrations.



Now, for the food. There are many so-called lucky foods that can bring you good fortune in the New Year. Here are several to try:

Uncut Noodles


These symbolize long life, and the longer they are, the better. Some options: Shrimp and Soba Noodles (shrimp brings happiness and good fortune), Soba Noodle Salad with Peanut Sauce or Sesame Noodles would be perfect for this.

Chinese Noodle Salad

Oranges


These symbolize wealth. A Blueberry and Orange Spinach Salad would be a great choice, especially if you switch the pecans for peanuts, which symbolize long life.

Chinese Orange Spinach Salad

Eggs


These symbolize fertility. Some Easy Egg Rolls would fit this lucky food perfectly for your celebration.

Chinese Egg Rolls Recipe

Chinese Cabbage


This symbolizes good fortune for the New Year. A dish like Chinese Cabbage Salad is a delicious addition to your Chinese New Year celebration. (Hint: Purchase "take out" containers from a Chinese restaurant or dollar store to serve it in!)

Traditional Chinese New Year Food

Click here if you want to know more about Chinese food symbolism.

Are you going to celebrate the Chinese New Year? Tell us how below!


 

Sarah W. Caron (aka scaron) is a food writer, editor and blogger who writes about family-friendly foods and raising a healthy family at Sarah’s Cucina Bella.
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