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Gold Medal® Classic Biscuits

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Gold Medal® Classic Biscuits
  • Prep Time 10 min
  • Total Time 25 min
  • Servings 12
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Gold Medal® Classic Biscuits

Piping hot biscuits! Enjoy these melt-in-your-mouth, easy-to-make classics.

Ingredients

2
cups Gold Medal™ all-purpose flour
1
tablespoon sugar
3
teaspoons baking powder
1
teaspoon salt
1/2
cup shortening, butter or margarine
3/4
cup milk

Directions

  • 1 Heat the oven to 450°F. In a medium bowl, stir the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt until mixed. Cut in the shortening using a pastry blender or fork, until mixture looks like fine crumbs. Stir in the milk until mixture forms a soft dough and leaves the side of the bowl (dough will be soft and sticky).
  • 2 Lightly sprinkle flour over a cutting board or countertop. Place dough on floured surface; gently roll in the flour to coat. To knead dough, fold dough toward you. With the heels of your hands, lightly push dough away from you with a short rocking motion. Move dough a quarter turn and repeat 10 times. Dough will feel springy and smooth.
  • 3 On the floured surface, flatten dough evenly, using hands or a rolling pin, until dough is 1/2 inch thick.
  • 4 Before cutting each biscuit, dip a 2 1/2-inch round cutter into flour to lightly coat it so it will cut cleanly through the dough without sticking. To cut, push the cutter straight down through the dough without twisting or turning. Cut the biscuits as close together as possible. On an ungreased cookie sheet, place biscuits about 1 inch apart for biscuits with crusty sides, or place with sides touching for biscuits with soft sides.
  • 5 Bake 10 to 12 minutes or until golden brown. Immediately remove from cookie sheet. Serve warm.
See Step By Step

Step By Step  

How to Make Biscuits

As prepared by tbspSusan,

The lowdown on different types of biscuits – plus ideas for your next meal.


From simple side to delicious dish, biscuits are a great, inexpensive and easy-to-make food for your next meal. Biscuits can be enjoyed in any number of ways from sandwiches, treats, main dishes or complements to a main dish or soup.

Types of Biscuits


Along with the various ways you can work biscuits into a meal, there are several different types of biscuits. The biggest difference is probably between the so-called American and English biscuits. In America, most typically think of biscuits like those you get at your favorite fried chicken restaurant chain – light, buttery and soft. In many other areas of the world, biscuits are more akin to American cookies – hard and sweet.

Today, I’ll be focusing on American biscuits.

Biscuits were brought to the early Americas as a cheap and easy way to feed lots of people. Back then, they were generally made and served with warm gravy – still a favorite meal in the US, especially in the southern states.

Most American biscuit recipes are pretty similar. As you can see from a few of Tablespoon’s biscuit recipes –Gold Medal Classic Biscuits and Famous Buttermilk Biscuits – the ingredients are mostly the same. Usually, it’s just the proportions of those ingredients that change from recipe to recipe, but there are still some great substitutions and additions that can be made.

Biscuits and gravy

Some Variations


Besides classic biscuits made with flour, milk and shortening, a few other variations exist. Buttermilk biscuits replace milk or water with buttermilk to give the biscuit a slightly different taste. Cheese biscuits add in shredded cheese to offer a little more variety. Or, you can get even more creative with recipes like this one for Bacon Quiche Biscuit Cups.

Biscuits are typically mixed by hand to ensure the shortening is blended into the dough evenly. After kneading the dough, biscuits can be either spoon dropped onto a pan for "drop" biscuits or they can be cut out using a cookie cutter or an old, clean soup can. Drop biscuits turn out a bit crispier as the top of the biscuit is filled with peaks and valleys whereas cut biscuits turn out a bit more polished looking. Large drop biscuits are sometimes called "cat head" biscuits for their large cat-like appearance.

Topping It Off


When it comes to eating your biscuit, you’ve got several options. As mentioned earlier, biscuits and gravy are a common pair. Breakfast sandwiches are also quite popular, and can easily be made by quickly microwaving an egg in a small glass dish and adding cheese and bacon bits. For a sweeter food, you can top your biscuit with honey or jelly.

There’s no end to the ways you can use biscuits. Be sure to take a moment to share your fave or add your own biscuit recipe!

See Recipe
Tips  

Spray the cookie sheet with cooking spray. Increase milk to 1 cup. Drop dough by 12 spoonfuls, about 2 inches apart, onto the cookie sheet.

To cut biscuits, push a round cutter dipped in flour straight down in the dough. Remove excess dough around biscuits. Using a turner, move each biscuit to a cookie sheet. To cut remaining biscuits, gather the excess dough together and gently flatten dough until 1/2 inch thick. Use as little additional four on the surface as possible to prevent tough dry biscuits.

Nutrition Information 

NUTRITION INFORMATION PER SERVING

Serving Size: 1 Biscuit
Calories
190
(
Calories from Fat
90
)
Daily Value
Total Fat
10g
15%
(
Saturated Fat
6g
31%
,
Trans Fat
0g
)
Cholesterol
25mg
9%
Sodium
460mg
19%
Potassium
55mg
2%
Total Carbohydrate
22g
7%
(
Dietary Fiber
0g
0%
,
Sugars
2g
)
Protein
3g
Daily Value*:
Vitamin A
6%
6%
Vitamin C
0%
0%
Calcium
10%
10%
Iron
8%
8%
Exchanges:
1 Starch; 0 Fruit; 1/2 Other Carbohydrate; 0 Skim Milk; 0 Low-Fat Milk; 0 Milk; 0 Vegetable; 0 Very Lean Meat; 0 Lean Meat; 0 High-Fat Meat; 2 Fat;
Carbohydrate Choice
1 1/2
*Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.
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