MENU
  • Pinterest
    537
  • Print
    951
  • Save
    353
  • Facebook
    87
  • Email
    110

Copycat Panda Express™ Chow Mein

  • Prep 10 min
  • Total 20 min
  • Servings 4

Just like your favorite eat-in Chinese! This chow mein makes a great side. Or serve it up with chicken and make it a meal. MORE + LESS -

Cheeky Kitchen Cheeky Kitchen
January 24, 2017

Ingredients

1 1/2
cups Progresso™ Broth (chicken or vegetable)
2
packs (4 oz each) yakisoba noodles
2
tablespoons sesame or coconut oil
4
stalks celery, very finely sliced
1/2
medium yellow onion, peeled and very finely sliced
1/4
head cabbage, thinly sliced
2
tablespoons cooking wine or sake (or 2 tablespoons rice vinegar)
2-3 tablespoons soy sauce (or more, to taste)

Steps

Hide Images
  • 1
    In a large deep-sided sauté pan or wok, bring broth to a boil. Add noodles, cooking until separated (about 2 minutes, do not overcook) in the uncovered pot. Strain from any remaining broth. Transfer to a bowl and set aside.
  • 2
    In same pan, heat 1 tablespoon sesame oil over high heat. Add celery, onion and cabbage.
  • 3
    Stir-fry until the edges of some pieces of cabbage begin to turn golden. Add cooking wine to the pan and allow to sizzle for 10 seconds or so.
  • 4
    Return noodles to pan and toss with soy sauce and 1 tablespoon sesame oil.
  • 5
    Stir-fry until hot and noodles begin to turn golden. Serve and enjoy!

Expert Tips

  • You’ll usually be able to find cooked yakisoba in the refrigerated section of most grocers (by the vegan foods and produce), or dried yakisoba noodles near the ramen (or in the Asian section). If the only yakisoba noodles offered at your grocery store are in microwaveable flavored yakisoba noodle cups, just discard any flavoring packets and use only the noodles for this recipe. Works like a charm!
  • Quick, choose one: rice or chow mein? If your answer is undoubtedly “chow mein,” here’s how you can get more of your favorite side dish. A copycat recipe so close to the original, you won’t be able to tell a difference between the two. The trick here is to use yakisoba noodles. You’ll usually be able to find cooked yakisoba in the refrigerated section (by the vegan foods and produce) or dried yakisoba noodles near the ramen (or in the Asian section) of most grocers. Either works fine. But the real secret is to make sure whichever version you use isn’t overcooked. In the classic dish, the noodles are cooked until barely tender, then essentially fried with cabbage, celery and a light sesame-soy sauce. Do the same, and you’ll be delighted with the results. Stay in tonight and make your own take-out. With this easy recipe, you’ll feel like you’re eating out…in the comfort of your own kitchen.

Nutrition Information

No nutrition information available for this recipe
More About This Recipe
  • Quick, choose one: rice or chow mein? If your answer is undoubtedly “chow mein,” here’s how you can get more of your favorite side dish. A copycat recipe so close to the original, you won’t be able to tell a difference between the two.

    The trick here is to use yakisoba noodles. You’ll usually be able to find cooked yakisoba in the refrigerated section (by the vegan foods and produce) or dried yakisoba noodles near the ramen (or in the Asian section) of most grocers. Either works fine. But the real secret is to make sure whichever version you use isn’t overcooked. 

    In the classic dish, the noodles are cooked until barely tender, then essentially fried with cabbage, celery and a light sesame-soy sauce. Do the same, and you’ll be delighted with the results.

    Stay in tonight and make your own take-out. With this easy recipe, you’ll feel like you’re eating out…in the comfort of your own kitchen.
  • Trademarks referred to herein are the properties of their respective owners.

© 2017 ®/TM General Mills All Rights Reserved

Comment